Tomorrow Is Too Long to Wait for Inclusion

ParaEducate: A Resource for Inclusive Educators

book review; four books stacked on top of each other with a pencil on the top of the stack

ParaEducate

In a time when resources for training are slim to nil, it is so important to have a resource for paraprofessionals like ParaEducate (Gross, Marquez, Kurth, & Yamasaki, 2012). Many times, paraprofessionals are on the “front-lines” of inclusion programming and depending on the prior knowledge of each staff, or how each district handles professional development, they can be ill-equipped to deal with the challenges of working one-on-one with students with disabilities.

ParaEducate takes the guess work out of many situations that arise when working with students with special needs in a general education classroom. From a brief history of special education to defining what an Individualized Education Program (IEP) is, ParaEducate serves as an essential reference for paraprofessionals who find themselves in a new position or simply need a refresher course in a job they have been doing for a while. Gross et al. (2012) provide concrete examples for paraprofessionals to deal with challenging behaviors, adapting materials, and providing opportunities to increase communication for the student with special needs.

Something that I appreciate about the book is that it starts with the assumption that special education students should be included, “regardless of disability, within the general education setting with appropriate supports” with their same age peers (p.16). Written in a readable format without watering down any content, ParaEducate is a valuable resource for classroom teachers to purchase for their staff as well as administrators looking for a comprehensive overview of the duties of paraprofessionals. This book belongs in every special education teacher’s library (especially if you work with paraprofessionals on a daily basis).

(affiliate link)

Megan Gross has also written a fantastic article on Positive Behavior Supports in the inclusive classroom for us. You can find it here. In addition, she is the co-author of The Inclusion Toolbox: Strategies and Techniques for All Teachers, another incredible resource for the inclusive classroom. 

Don’t forget to visit and “like” the ParaEducate Facebook page.

Photo Credit: Christopher/Flickr

The following two tabs change content below.

Tim Villegas

Founder and Curator-At-Large at Think Inclusive
Tim Villegas has worked in the field of special education and with people with disabilities for over ten years. Tim has turned his passion for blogging and promoting ideas about inclusive schools and communities into his own website, thinkinclusive.us. He believes that we can create a bridge between educators, parents, and advocates (including self-advocates) to promote ideas, innovation and inspiration to change our world to be more accepting and value each and every human being. Tim lives with his fetching wife and three adorable children in Marietta, GA.

Pin It on Pinterest